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Why Can't I "Get Found" on Fiverr?

Updated: Jul 15, 2020

If the pilgrims roaming the land of Fiverr learned of a Great Oracle they could visit only once in their sojourn, and could ask it only one question, I think this might be the question the majority would choose: "How can I excel at "getting found" in Fiverr search?" Getting found isn't the only thing we need to do well on the platform, but let's face it...if we aren't found, we aren't used, Period, end of story.


"The Lost Boys"


If Fiverr were Never Neverland, these wandering souls would be the lost boys (and girls), Seldom if ever surfacing in search, they feel permanently exiled to the "netherland" part of Neverland. They get no attention, feel no love, and receive no consolation (or compensation), aside from commiserating in forums with others in a similar plight.


Enough eloquence. Let's get down to business. There's no one magic bullet, but here are six things you can do, to help you get on the buyer's radar on Fiverr:


Six Elements That Affect Search Results

  1. Wording: Fiverr's search engine is just that, a search engine, and has much in common with Google's. The search engine "spiders" all the seller profiles and gigs, gathering information, and especially, words. Those words, the words you want to be found by, must be prevalent throughout your gig. As you identify your strengths as a narrator, an artist, or whatever you do, think about the words people are most likely to use when looking for your service...and use them..

  2. Reputation: Reputation must be earned, and that's the trick of it when you're new on the platform. It's the old chicken and the egg thing, like the problem of needing a job to get a recommendation, and needing a recommendation to get a job. But that's the reality we face when we're starting out on Fiverr. For that reason, be sure you absolutely knock gigs out of the park for those first clients. Don't disappoint them. You need them coming back for more (as in, repeat customers), and leaving behind them the "golden eggs" I discuss next.

  3. Ratings and Reviews: When you start on Fiverr, traditionally they give you a push in search, to help you get those first few sales. Don't let them down. Respond quickly and professionally, deliver early, go the extra mile, and, importantly, call for the review. When doing so, don't ask for a specific rating, which can get you trouble fast, but instead, in a line, explain truthfully why reviews are so important to you. It's amazing how well that approach works. I get around 85% of my buyers to leave a review, simply by "calling for it" in my followup message at the end of the gig.

  4. Realistic Pricing: One of the biggest mistakes I see newcomers make is immediately trying to charge the same on Fiverr as they're used to getting in the open market. They either do this by lowballing their starting price and backloading it with a grievously high commercial rights fee, or by flat-out setting their starting price high. That can be the kiss of death for a new seller. Remember, when you start out on this platform, you need to prove yourself. To do so, you need initial sales, and as many as possible. Don't shoot yourself in both feet early on by pricing high. Focus on sales, not income. Say that over and over to yourself. Sales, not income. That's the key to start with. Rate increases come later.

  5. Social Proof: This catchall-phrase encompasses reputation and ratings/reviews, and is believed to also involve your efforts to create social media connections; the following of links to your gig from out in social mediadom in places like Facebook Twitter, etc. When you do share a link to your gig, from your social sites, it's very important that you use the URL Fiverr supplies for that purpose, which is different than what you see in the address box of a browser when you visit the gig. The social sharing link is found by going to your gigs page and clicking on the down arrow at the right end of the line, for the gig you want to share. You'll see the sharing option there, where you can copy the sharing gig link.

  6. Insider Reviews: This one is more speculative on my part, but I have reason to believe Fiverr keeps its own set of internal ratings based on a somewhat cloak-and-dagger gig followup procedure they're known to engage in. Quietly, and periodically, they contact buyers after you've concluded a gig with them, and essentially ask, "What did you actually think of this seller?" There's a reason they ask. Your buyer may feel compelled to leave a five star review, but may harbor unspoken reservations or grievances about the experience they had with you. This additional data gives Fiverr a more three dimensional view of the seller. I wouldn't be at all surprised if this internal, insider rating information factors into how well we do in search results. It's just one more reason to hit home runs every time with your buyers, and leave them genuinely happy. The Fiverr Gold "Ten Proven Ways to Earn More on Fiverr course is an excellent resource to learn techniques that will thrill your buyers, whic